two.jpg
MR_BeardedMaleStatue copy.jpg
MR_installation11 copy.jpg
  

 

0035_101-640x449.jpg
MR_2007_Plate with Geometric Design (IM14733) copy.jpg
  Beside each object lies a museum label with factual details about the lost object. Serving as a display structure for the recreated artifacts is a long continuous table, whose shape derives from the measurements and layout of the Processional Way.

Beside each object lies a museum label with factual details about the lost object. Serving as a display structure for the recreated artifacts is a long continuous table, whose shape derives from the measurements and layout of the Processional Way.

MR_2007_Dagger (IM4307) copy.jpg
MR_2007_Headless Male Figure (Kh. IV 112) copy.jpg
    The museum label for each reconstructed artifact lists its museum number, provenance, and other identifying facts. Replacing the narrative information about each lost object are quotes from Iraqi archeologists, American military commanders, and others reacting to the looting, resulting in a fragmented dialogue across the display table.    

The museum label for each reconstructed artifact lists its museum number, provenance, and other identifying facts. Replacing the narrative information about each lost object are quotes from Iraqi archeologists, American military commanders, and others reacting to the looting, resulting in a fragmented dialogue across the display table.

 

0013_871-495x660.jpg
  Shortly after his arrival in the US, Dr. George visited  The invisible enemy should not exist  at Lombard-Freid Projects. Here he is giving an impromptu tour of the artifacts, as he could no longer do in his former museum in Baghdad.   

Shortly after his arrival in the US, Dr. George visited The invisible enemy should not exist at Lombard-Freid Projects. Here he is giving an impromptu tour of the artifacts, as he could no longer do in his former museum in Baghdad.

 

    Subsequent iterations of  The invisible enemy should not exist  have been presented with new groupings of artifacts as more and more are reconstructed. Wherever possible, the artifacts are arranged by a local archeologist, researcher, or curator of Mesopotamian antiquities. Here is Dr. Michael Seymour, Researcher in the Department of the Middle East at The British Museum arranging the artifacts exhibited at Modern Art Oxford in April, 2009.    

Subsequent iterations of The invisible enemy should not exist have been presented with new groupings of artifacts as more and more are reconstructed. Wherever possible, the artifacts are arranged by a local archeologist, researcher, or curator of Mesopotamian antiquities. Here is Dr. Michael Seymour, Researcher in the Department of the Middle East at The British Museum arranging the artifacts exhibited at Modern Art Oxford in April, 2009.

 

MR_installation4 copy.jpg
   The invisible enemy should not exist , installed at the Sharjah Art Museum as part of Sharjah Biennial 8, where the project received a Jury’s Award.

The invisible enemy should not exist, installed at the Sharjah Art Museum as part of Sharjah Biennial 8, where the project received a Jury’s Award.

   The invisible enemy should not exist , installed at the Sharjah Art Museum as part of Sharjah Biennial 8, where the project received a Jury’s Award.

The invisible enemy should not exist, installed at the Sharjah Art Museum as part of Sharjah Biennial 8, where the project received a Jury’s Award.

IMG_1119.JPG
IMG_1121.JPG
  Other drawings reveal the narrative of Dr. Donny George, former Director of the National Museum in Baghdad, who worked to recover looted artifacts. Under Hussein, Dr. George worked at archeological sites to avoid Ba’ath Party meetings and also sidelined as a drummer in the band 99%, which specialized in Deep Purple covers. A version of their “Smoke on the Water,” commissioned from NY-based Arabic band  Ayyoub , provides sound for the show. After threats to his family, Dr. George resigned his post, fleeing to Syria. He arrived recently in the US as a Visiting Professor of Anthropology at SUNY Stony Brook.

Other drawings reveal the narrative of Dr. Donny George, former Director of the National Museum in Baghdad, who worked to recover looted artifacts. Under Hussein, Dr. George worked at archeological sites to avoid Ba’ath Party meetings and also sidelined as a drummer in the band 99%, which specialized in Deep Purple covers. A version of their “Smoke on the Water,” commissioned from NY-based Arabic band Ayyoub, provides sound for the show. After threats to his family, Dr. George resigned his post, fleeing to Syria. He arrived recently in the US as a Visiting Professor of Anthropology at SUNY Stony Brook.

IMG_1145.JPG
invisible04.jpg
invisible05.jpg
MR_2009_21 enemy_tablette.jpg
MR_2007_Chariot (IM31389) copy.jpg
MR_Baboon copy.jpg
MR_HeadlessFemaleMaleRelief copy.jpg
MR_FemFeetChildSkirtedMale copy.jpg
MR_Friese copy.jpg
MR_King copy.jpg
two.jpg
MR_BeardedMaleStatue copy.jpg
MR_installation11 copy.jpg
  
0035_101-640x449.jpg
MR_2007_Plate with Geometric Design (IM14733) copy.jpg
  Beside each object lies a museum label with factual details about the lost object. Serving as a display structure for the recreated artifacts is a long continuous table, whose shape derives from the measurements and layout of the Processional Way.
MR_2007_Dagger (IM4307) copy.jpg
MR_2007_Headless Male Figure (Kh. IV 112) copy.jpg
    The museum label for each reconstructed artifact lists its museum number, provenance, and other identifying facts. Replacing the narrative information about each lost object are quotes from Iraqi archeologists, American military commanders, and others reacting to the looting, resulting in a fragmented dialogue across the display table.    
0013_871-495x660.jpg
  Shortly after his arrival in the US, Dr. George visited  The invisible enemy should not exist  at Lombard-Freid Projects. Here he is giving an impromptu tour of the artifacts, as he could no longer do in his former museum in Baghdad.   
    Subsequent iterations of  The invisible enemy should not exist  have been presented with new groupings of artifacts as more and more are reconstructed. Wherever possible, the artifacts are arranged by a local archeologist, researcher, or curator of Mesopotamian antiquities. Here is Dr. Michael Seymour, Researcher in the Department of the Middle East at The British Museum arranging the artifacts exhibited at Modern Art Oxford in April, 2009.    
MR_installation4 copy.jpg
   The invisible enemy should not exist , installed at the Sharjah Art Museum as part of Sharjah Biennial 8, where the project received a Jury’s Award.
   The invisible enemy should not exist , installed at the Sharjah Art Museum as part of Sharjah Biennial 8, where the project received a Jury’s Award.
IMG_1119.JPG
IMG_1121.JPG
  Other drawings reveal the narrative of Dr. Donny George, former Director of the National Museum in Baghdad, who worked to recover looted artifacts. Under Hussein, Dr. George worked at archeological sites to avoid Ba’ath Party meetings and also sidelined as a drummer in the band 99%, which specialized in Deep Purple covers. A version of their “Smoke on the Water,” commissioned from NY-based Arabic band  Ayyoub , provides sound for the show. After threats to his family, Dr. George resigned his post, fleeing to Syria. He arrived recently in the US as a Visiting Professor of Anthropology at SUNY Stony Brook.
IMG_1145.JPG
invisible04.jpg
invisible05.jpg
MR_2009_21 enemy_tablette.jpg
MR_2007_Chariot (IM31389) copy.jpg
MR_Baboon copy.jpg
MR_HeadlessFemaleMaleRelief copy.jpg
MR_FemFeetChildSkirtedMale copy.jpg
MR_Friese copy.jpg
MR_King copy.jpg

 

Beside each object lies a museum label with factual details about the lost object. Serving as a display structure for the recreated artifacts is a long continuous table, whose shape derives from the measurements and layout of the Processional Way.

The museum label for each reconstructed artifact lists its museum number, provenance, and other identifying facts. Replacing the narrative information about each lost object are quotes from Iraqi archeologists, American military commanders, and others reacting to the looting, resulting in a fragmented dialogue across the display table.

 

Shortly after his arrival in the US, Dr. George visited The invisible enemy should not exist at Lombard-Freid Projects. Here he is giving an impromptu tour of the artifacts, as he could no longer do in his former museum in Baghdad.

 

Subsequent iterations of The invisible enemy should not exist have been presented with new groupings of artifacts as more and more are reconstructed. Wherever possible, the artifacts are arranged by a local archeologist, researcher, or curator of Mesopotamian antiquities. Here is Dr. Michael Seymour, Researcher in the Department of the Middle East at The British Museum arranging the artifacts exhibited at Modern Art Oxford in April, 2009.

 

The invisible enemy should not exist, installed at the Sharjah Art Museum as part of Sharjah Biennial 8, where the project received a Jury’s Award.

The invisible enemy should not exist, installed at the Sharjah Art Museum as part of Sharjah Biennial 8, where the project received a Jury’s Award.

Other drawings reveal the narrative of Dr. Donny George, former Director of the National Museum in Baghdad, who worked to recover looted artifacts. Under Hussein, Dr. George worked at archeological sites to avoid Ba’ath Party meetings and also sidelined as a drummer in the band 99%, which specialized in Deep Purple covers. A version of their “Smoke on the Water,” commissioned from NY-based Arabic band Ayyoub, provides sound for the show. After threats to his family, Dr. George resigned his post, fleeing to Syria. He arrived recently in the US as a Visiting Professor of Anthropology at SUNY Stony Brook.

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